Invitation from the Department of Philosophy: Book launch - November 27th, 2013


THE DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SUDBURY
INVITES STUDENTS, COLLEAGUES, EMPLOYEES AND FRIENDS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SUDBURY
AND LAURENTIAN UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY TO A
BOOK LAUNCH
TO CELEBRATE THE PUBLICATION OF BOOKS BY TWO OF ITS FACULTY MEMBERS:


Dr. CAROL COLLIER,
Recovering the Body: A Philosophical Story (Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, 2013)

and

Dr. RACHEL HALIBURTON
Autonomy and the Situated Self: A Challenge to Bioethics (Lanham: Lexington,2013)


Where: 3rd Floor Lounge (room 309),Universityof Sudbury

When: Wednesday, November 27, 2013, 5:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Wine and Cheese will be served.


These two books have several themes in common.  One of them will be emphasized during the book launch, namely:

THE ORPHANED BODY AND THE SELF ADRIFT


If we continue to understand ourselves as a combination of mind and body, then this is not a happy union, according to the two new books.

Carol Collier shows in her Recovering the Body: A Philosophical Story how the metaphysical and epistemological projects of distinguishing mind from body in effect cut us off from a fuller sense of our bodies, leaving them orphaned and setting ourselves adrift.

Rachel Haliburton, in her Autonomy and the Situated Self: A Challenge to Bioethics, show the impetus of bioethics to criticize and to transform questionable medical practices has become littlemore than a defense of existing institutional arrangements in the name of a self detached from any commitment other than its ability to choose.

Join us as these two philosophers invite us to recover a sense of our bodies and re-situate our selves.

Carol Collier and Rachel Haliburton are both Associate Professors of Philosophy at the University of Sudbury.  They are also the co-authors of the very successful Bioethics in Canada: A Philosophical Introduction (Toronto: Canadian Scholar's Press, 2011).

"We will see a body impervious to external forces, be they wind or breath, operating solely under the principles of matter and mechanism.  With multiple shifts in the notions of body, soul and cosmos, the impermeable and objective body, along with the autonomous willing 'self,' will be born." - CarolCollier

"At the centre of much contemporary bioethics stands the figure of the Choosing Self... what is most striking about the Choosing Self is its formlessness...  It is characterized not by what it believes, or through its connections and interactions with others, but simply by its capacity to make autonomous choices.” - Rachel Haliburton

A- A A+